SEC Filings

10-Q
CIMPRESS N.V. filed this Form 10-Q on 11/03/2017
Entire Document
 

The following table represents the changes in fair value of Level 3 contingent consideration:
 
Three Months Ended September 30,
 
2017 (1)
 
2016 (2)
Balance at June 30
$
5,453

 
$
1,212

Fair value adjustment
102

 
1,112

Foreign currency impact
179

 
15

Balance at September 30
$
5,734

 
$
2,339

_____________________
(1) Classified as a current liability as of June 30, 2017 and September 30, 2017 on the consolidated balance sheet.
(2) Classified as a long-term liability as of June 30, 2016 and September 30, 2016 on the consolidated balance sheet.

As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017, the carrying amounts of our cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and other current liabilities approximated their estimated fair values. As of September 30, 2017 and June 30, 2017 the carrying value of our debt, excluding debt issuance costs and debt discounts, was $829,289 and $882,578, respectively, and the fair value was $837,510 and $906,744, respectively. Our debt at September 30, 2017 includes variable rate debt instruments indexed to LIBOR that resets periodically and fixed rate debt instruments. The estimated fair value of our debt was determined using available market information based on recent trades or activity of debt instruments with substantially similar risks, terms and maturities, which fall within Level 2 under the fair value hierarchy. The estimated fair value of assets and liabilities disclosed above may not be representative of actual values that could have been or will be realized in the future.
4. Derivative Financial Instruments
We use derivative financial instruments, such as interest rate swap contracts, cross-currency swap contracts, and currency forward and option contracts, to manage interest rate and foreign currency exposures. Derivatives are recorded in the consolidated balance sheets at fair value. If the derivative is designated as a cash flow hedge or net investment hedge, then the effective portion of changes in the fair value of the derivative is recorded in accumulated other comprehensive loss and is subsequently reclassified into earnings in the period the hedged forecasted transaction affects earnings. If a derivative is deemed to be ineffective, then the ineffective portion of the change in fair value of the derivative is recognized directly in earnings. The change in the fair value of derivatives not designated as hedges is recognized directly in earnings, as a component of other expense, net.
Hedges of Interest Rate Risk
We enter into interest rate swap contracts to manage variability in the amount of our known or expected cash payments related to a portion of our debt. Our objective in using interest rate swaps is to add stability to interest expense and to manage our exposure to interest rate movements. We designate our interest rate swaps as cash flow hedges. Interest rate swaps designated as cash flow hedges involve the receipt of variable amounts from a counterparty in exchange for us making fixed-rate payments over the life of the contract agreements without exchange of the underlying notional amount. Realized gains or losses from interest rate swaps are recorded in earnings, as a component of interest expense, net. A portion of two of our interest rate swap contracts was deemed to be ineffective during the three months ended September 30, 2017. For the ineffective portion, we recognized $31 of gains as part of other expense, net in our consolidated statement of operations during the three months ended September 30, 2017. We did not hold any contracts deemed to be ineffective during the prior comparative period.
Amounts reported in accumulated other comprehensive loss related to interest rate swap contracts will be reclassified to interest expense as interest payments are accrued or made on our variable-rate debt. As of September 30, 2017, we estimate that $510 will be reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss to interest expense during the twelve months ending September 30, 2018. As of September 30, 2017, we had eight outstanding interest rate swap contracts indexed to one-month LIBOR. These instruments were designated as cash flow hedges of interest rate risk and have varying start dates and maturity dates through June 2025.
Interest rate swap contracts outstanding:
 
Notional Amounts
Contracts accruing interest as of September 30, 2017
 
$
60,000

Contracts with a future start date
 
240,000

Total
 
$
300,000


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